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The Best Gift You Can Give Your Team This Holiday Season
 
Years employed in large, corporate, private sector, Human Resources departments found me in all kinds of annual holiday parties including ballrooms, catering, bartenders, and even raffles for nice electronic gifts. I still use some of the gadgets, thank you very much! After decades of these parties, there is only one tradition that really held meaning and I like to share with the leaders that I coach.

 

I was working for the City of Mesa, Arizona HR Division and serving the Mesa Fire and Medical Department. The Chief at the time, Chief Dennis Compton, held his December staff meeting as an open meeting in a larger than usual venue. All department members and partners (like me) were invited. He spent 1 hour….just one hour. And here is what he did. He went through a presentation of all of our accomplishments during the past year. They were bulleted on slides, they were brief, and they were reported by all areas to be shared. It may sound simple, it may even seem obvious. But I don’t recall any other leader I’ve worked for doing this in this way.

 

As he read through the massive list, I felt like a kid watching the Polar Express. I couldn’t help but be moved by what a team of professionals, dedicated to a mission could pull off in 12 months. It was moving, it was humbling to be working with all of them, and even more to find yourself included in the presentation. That was like hearing your name called at graduation! Even if it was just the name of a team you worked on. He stood, and presented all of the accomplishments, and sometimes provided brief context. There was information about the number of accidents that were prevented, lives that were saved, programs implemented, training completed, and more than we can think of as individuals. On and on it would go until the end when we were told;
 
“All of that happened while we carried on our main operational mission and responded to xx,xxx emergency calls.”
 
Sometimes he would add a special letter he received from someone honoring a large or small act of heroism that was provided to the community served. It was all so remarkable. You could feel the emotion in the air. It helped us appreciate each other and closed some of the “us versus them” feelings that can crop up in any organization. You realized that your contribution WAS important even though you may be in a support role.

 

The Chief felt strongly that it was important to take 1 hour a year and honor the staff. He recently told me it was important that the successes reported were from the staff’s achievements, not the Chief’s (or leader’s) wins. And it has to be accurate – ground in reality.

 

My high school track coach taught me to run, and don’t look back for fear of slowing down. When our work gets busy, the demands of the year-end are upon us, and holiday extras start distracting your team, consider rejecting my track coach’s advice. Instead, look back….slow down. Stop and spend time honoring your people. Create a culture of acknowledgement, affirmation, appreciation and celebration. Spend 1 hour and celebrate them in a meaningful way. If they are like me, and many others I know, they’ll remember it forever.
 
• Who can do this? Any leader can celebrate his or her team
• How? Gather accomplishments you have tracked and ask other leaders or staff for theirs
• When? End of the year with holidays, to launch the New Year, or when it makes sense for you
• What? Gather, show and tell results, and be sure to include everyone but yours (this one is about them)
• Who? Invite your team and partners; record for anyone missing
• Why? Leadership heroes honor those who work for the team – it’s inspiring with a side of motivation, connectedness, and pride.

 


Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor:
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

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Juggling Personal Relationships and Professional Ambitions

Listen to the PODCAST here

http://epodcastnetwork.com/juggling-personal-relationships-and-professional-ambitions-with-kelly-walsh/

 

Duration: 13:54

Listen to host Eric Dye & guest Kelly Walsh discuss the following:

 

  • Remind our listeners what is 1 Smart Life?
  • One of your areas of expertise is work-life balance. Can you give our listeners some tips on how to juggle personal relationships and professional ambitions?
  • Talk to us about the teeter-totter conundrum. How does that concept apply to every day life?
  • Who should hire a life coach?
  • What is the difference between a life coach and a therapist?
  • With the extra stress of the holidays, does it make work-life balance even harder? How do you manage extra stress and unique situations?

 



Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor: 
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

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The Teeter-Totter Conundrum: Achieving Work-Life Balance

The article can also be read on CEO Magazine. (http://the-ceo-magazine.com)

 

http://blogs.the-ceo-magazine.com/guest/teeter-totter-conundrum-achieving-work-life-balance

 

The never-ending struggle of reconciling a professional life with, well, any other kind of life, is often considered as a question of balance. How do I balance personal relationships and professional ambitions? How can I juggle the demands of my job and my family? Amid all this talk of balancing and juggling, I’d like to throw in my two cents and say that I find the best, most apt metaphor for work-life harmony to be that of a teeter-totter.

 

Yes, that oddly named fixture of playgrounds everywhere is the best visual guide I can give you to thinking about your professional and personal relationships, because, on a teeter-totter, as in all relationships, it takes two to make the thing function properly. If you dig your feet in and refuse to budge on your end of the teeter-totter, you’ll have your counterpart held hostage up in the air. If the other person decides to up and leave without warning, you’ll be sent crashing to the ground for one painful landing. These push-and-pull dynamics are more than simple physics: they’re the principles that govern our interpersonal exchanges on an emotional and intellectual level.

 

Whenever you’re feeling overwhelmed with the amount of responsibilities that you feel are on you, remind yourself that, while you certainly do have commitments and obligations to honor, the expectations surrounding them are a two-way street. You shouldn’t be afraid to ask for a little quid-pro-quo in your professional (and personal) relationships. I’ve compiled a few simple suggestions to help set you on the path to valuing your own worth and getting the most out of your business interactions.

 

Communication. We’re talking about the Golden Rule of work-life balance. Being honest, direct, and realistic is the best policy whether you’re an employer or an employee. If you’re in a position to do so, make your expectations of staff members explicit—no hidden tests or misleading understatements—and if you’re on the receiving end of those expectations, be upfront about your own abilities, so as to play to your strengths and interests and help your employer understand how to most efficiently organize his or her team. More generally speaking, also be sure to build relationships on a positive foundation, even if it’s something as simple as a shared enthusiasm for the Food Network, because no one wants to be known as a favor-seeker or a perpetual bearer of bad news.

 

Flexibility. This goes for all parties: try your best to be accommodating, within reason. Not every “Jump!” should be met with a “How high?” but a willingness to be understanding or to learn a new skill will go a long way. Stick to the lines you’ve drawn (if you’ve made it clear that you only allow a two-day grace period for late work, go right ahead and enforce it), but be reasonable in considering what’s negotiable and what’s not.

 

Responsibility.Take ownership of your past actions and acknowledge your intention to do so for future ones. If you’ve made a mistake, as we all do, claim it, explain it, and correct it without any buck-passing. People will generally respond much more favorably to an honest acknowledgement of a shortcoming than to a barrage of excuses. You’re only human, and there’s no point in shirking ownership of that particular fact.

 

Attitude. Delivery is everything. “Positive attitude” is a phrase that probably graces the pages of every code of conduct ever written, but it’s persistent for a reason. If you’re able to leave your employer or employee with a sense of positivity, you’ll quickly become someone he or she will want to deal with more. There’s a difference between being a yes-man and being a positive presence: the one disingenuously alters truths and the other simply maintains a good outlook. You can respectfully disagree with someone and still be pleasant about it—and so you should.

 

There’s no quick fix or easy answer to any question involving individual ambitions and desires, but by being reasonable, approachable, and affable, you’ll certainly smooth the way towards equitable solutions to many a problem. Being on a teeter-totter may, if you’ll excuse the pun, have its ups and downs, but it’s only with full cooperation from both sides that everything stays in motion and makes for a fun ride.

 



Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor: 
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

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Clear Communication Is Vital When Running Business

The article can also be read on Regions Business Magazine. (http://philadelphia.regionsbusiness.com/)

 

http://philadelphia.regionsbusiness.com/print-edition-commentary/clear-communication-is-vital-when-running-business/

 

Your phone screen lights up as a news notification appears: “President gives address from White House.”

 

Turning to your computer to launch the Internet browser, you’re greeted by a homepage full of headlines saturated with disaster, destruction — and, of course, “shocking” reality TV revelations.

 

A perfunctory glance at Facebook finds the social media sector awash with heated discussion about the latest high-profile trial.

 

All this, and you’ve only been sitting at your desk for three minutes.

 

As technology has become more omnipresent, so too has media coverage of current events, turning them into consumable sound bites and one-line blurbs to be shared, retweeted, and dropped into conversation.

 

With Google Alerts and social media feeds cropping up throughout the day, political and diplomatic concerns have become a constant presence in the workplace, giving us all ample time to internalize the atmosphere of confusion and speculation that can accompany recent events such as the Syrian conflict and government shutdown.

 

The influence of this constant, rapid-fire reportage extends beyond the obvious, affecting your professional life in surprising ways as parallels emerge between your company’s internal affairs and our country’s international affairs.

 

Whether the context is corporate or diplomatic, there’s no denying the power of the rumor mill to generate bouts of misinformation-driven panic.

 

The mechanism at work is the same when you’re anxiously wondering how much truth is in the rumor about departmental downsizing as when you’re reading online commentary debating Assad’s next move. There may be some credibility in either case, but the speculative nature of that kind of “news” leaves plenty of room for unfounded assumptions and good old-fashioned gossip, too.

 

Rumors and conjecture have a way of taking root in the absence of direct, from-the-source statements, and it’s a dangerous fact of human nature that gossip is often just as, if not more, compelling than truth.

 

That’s why it’s so important, in the business realm as in many others, to communicate news and relevant information promptly, clearly, and responsibly. Rumors are only natural, but to avoid widespread misconceptions about the state of affairs within your organization, make sure leadership personnel are prepared to dispel them before things get out of hand.

 

To that end, it’s just as essential that company leadership present a united front in providing accessible and reliable information for employees — and outside interests.

 

Such a precaution will ensure that, when it comes to the big issues, there’ll be little room for misinterpretation, and therefore less cause for unpleasant surprises.

 

Just think back to recent developments in foreign affairs: the existence of a chemical weapons arsenal in Syria was still being considered “questionable” in U.S. media mere weeks ago, despite the fact that French and British teams had confirmed the use of Sarin gas as early as June. Lacking a decisive word on the matter, many Americans couldn’t have predicted two months back that the question of military intervention would be raised.

 

Mixed information opens the doors to mistrust and confusion in a professional setting as well, so it’s vital to make internal materials, such as policy information, memos, career ladder info, and even severance plans accessible to employees.

 

Communication is one of those professional ideals preached more often than practiced.

 

In theory, employees of all levels should understand what effects company-wide developments will have for them, but the reality is usually far from that.

 

Our own political reality, too, is far from achieving that kind of transparency. A habitual refrain from the American public in response to legislation and governmental policy is, “How does that affect me? What does that mean for me in my everyday life?”

 

The answers to those basic questions often get lost amidst complicated jargon and vague or biased statements from one contingent or another, and the results aren’t at all conducive to a well-functioning democratic process, much less a productive business.

 

The responsibility for communication is two-part: it’s up to leadership figures to clearly articulate goals, policies, and their possible results, but it’s equally incumbent upon employees to educate and inform themselves.

 

Most importantly, all should listen to each other.

 

The need for candid dialogue and intellectual freedoms is universal, and the consequences of ignoring this need can be seen playing out on a horrific, international scale in current media coverage.

 

In order to prevent disagreements of a personal or ideological nature from becoming antagonistic, cultivate a culture of openness in the workplace, encouraging forums for spirited discussion and constructive criticism.

 

Genuine feedback should be valued and rewarded, and you should remember that, even if you’re in a position of authority, giving explanations for your own views is conducive to honesty and productivity, and will humanize, rather than undermine, you as a leader.

 

In addition to encouraging public forums for dialogue, provide resources for safe, private conversations. Make sure everyone is aware of the availability of HR and employee relations staff members for confidential conversations and promote an open-door policy. No one should have misgivings about approaching you with their concerns.

 

Occasional confusion, dissent, and even conflict are inevitable components in any collaborative process, but the way you handle these issues — with respect and candor — will determine the success of your leadership.

 

Cut through the noise of conjecture and confusion with clear directives, decisive action, and consideration for the input of your peers.

 

Do that and you’ll be miles ahead of your political counterparts on this one.

 



Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor: 
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

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Teetering on a Breakdown: 5 Tips for Work-Life Balance

The article can also be read on inspiyr Live Better  (http://inspiyr.com/)


http://inspiyr.com/work-life-balance-5-tips/

 

How do I achieve work-life balance?

 

As a life and career coach, I get this question all the time. Even if you’ve never explicitly asked this of yourself or someone else, you’ve most certainly danced around it or raised it subconsciously while trying to finish a client’s report, make it to a friend’s party or decide whether it’s worth it to take a long weekend.

 

We all want to know the secret to arriving at – and staying at – that state of balance, that point where we feel contented and in control of these conflicting aspects of our lives.

The Truth About Achieving Work-Life Balance

But here’s the thing: balance isn’t a state. It’s a process. It’s a continual back-and-forth between individuals—something I like to illustrate with the example of a teeter-totter.

 

You’re probably familiar with this scenario from your own childhood: you and the person on the opposite end of the teeter-totter take turns going up and down, and it’s all good fun until one of you decides to dig your heels in, leaving your counterpart stranded up in the air.

 

And then there’s the other scenario, much worse, wherein your friend decides to up and leave without warning, sending you plummeting down to earth for one painful landing.

 

Professional relationships can be a lot like that. If an employer refuses to budge, the employee is effectively held up in the air, made hostage by his or her dependence on the employer—and equilibrium is lost. If it’s the employee who’s inflexible, the work-life balance is similarly disrupted and working relationships are undercut by a lack of trust or the knowledge that an employee isn’t truly committed to the opportunity given to them.

 

Exchanges like these, comprised of extreme highs and lows, can only lead to disgruntlement and dissatisfaction. It takes ongoing compromise from both parties to establish the sort of rapport that can make the workplace, much like the playground, a fun, productive environment.

5 Tips To Build Better Work-Life Balance

1. Communication

First build trust before asking for favors. Bond over your love of Downton Abbey because relationships matter. Then consider how you can cover for a coworker while one goes to a child’s event and you go to your art class the next evening.

 

Feel free to bring these ideas up to your boss. Your boss might not mind that you do something during official work hours if you have plans to answer e-mails while on the sidelines of the soccer field. The key is to show that you will demonstrate results and care for their needs while you communicate effectively about your needs.

2. Flexibility

I’m not saying that every request to jump should be met with a “How high?” but it would go a long way if you were to show a willingness to learn new things and be accommodating when possible.

 

If you’re honestly out of your depth with handling a new account or really can’t stay late on Tuesdays, relay that information honestly, sans whining, so as to make it clear that you’ll do what you can, when you can, but only within reason. This way you are setting up a collaboration with your employer and not putting your work and home in competition with one another. This can lower your stress and make you an ally with your employer.

3. Distractions

There are plenty of them, these days and they add up to more time than you think.

 

Smart-phones and Facebook feeds may be a vital part of your professional life, but hopefully you’ll know when you’re crossing over into distractedness. Try to make the process of focusing routine: when you’re on your work computer, work! Force yourself to be productive, even if it’s difficult in the beginning.

 

You’ll be much more efficient—and much better about leaving work in the office once you get home—if you can mentally separate the obligations and associations with each space.

4. Let go of guilt

Let’s face it, we all carry some guilt. We think about work at home and home at work. Somehow many of us have become guilt ridden as a way of life. Recognize and own your choices. Choose to be the best you in the present situation. Be okay with being 90 percent or 80 percent some of the time in one area.

5. Find Your Definition of Perfection

Do not let anyone define what you want to be. If you do not like cooking, then you do not have to be that Martha Stewart caliber chef. Decide what is truly important to you and work on that. If it isn’t what social media agrees with, turn it off. Measure yourself against your values and you are more likely to come up satisfied.

 

Even if the work-life balance payoff isn’t immediate, uphold your end of things: ultimately, it’s in everyone’s best interests to come up with an equitable solution. After all, the teeter-totter only works when both sides are willing to have their ups and downs!

 



Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor: 
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

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1SmartLife, offering convenient and affordable personal coaching to executives nationwide

Listen to the PODCAST here

http://epodcastnetwork.com/kelly-walsh-of-1smartlife-offering-convenient-and-affordable-personal-coaching-to-executives-nationwide/

 

Duration: 17:58

Listen to host Eric Dye & guest Kelly Walsh discuss the following:

 

  • What is 1 Smart Life?
  • What inspired you to open your own personal coaching/executive coach agency?
  • Please describe why every CEO needs their own life coach?
  • Why is 1 Smart Life different from any other personal coaching agency?
  • What is some advice you can give to people who may want to hire a life coach but do not know where to begin?
  • Where do you see 1 Smart Life a year from now?
  • Where can people go to start a session and do you offer any resources for people that may want to get started but first want to see what life coaching is all about?

 



Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor: 
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

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Finding Work-Life Balance is Really a Game of Teeter-Totter

The article can also be read on project eve.comKelly Walsh - Life Coach

http://www.projecteve.com/the-new-work-life-balancing-act/

 

You’ve heard this before: It’s just so difficult to juggle a job and a home life. I’m having a hard time juggling all these responsibilities. You’ve probably said it yourself at some point–it’s a common metaphor for balancing the professional and the personal because it’s an apt one. You might feel as though you’re the one performing for an audience of family, friends, coworkers, bosses, dealing with one thing after another in an amazing feat of circus-worthy coordination.

 

Work-Life Balance

 

But I think there’s an even better metaphor to describe the experience of being a modern woman in the workforce: a teeter-totter. Yes, that playground staple with the funny name is, in my opinion, the perfect analogy for the relationships that structure our busy lives, because we all too often forget that relationships are exactly what we’re talking about when we discuss work-life balance. You’re not just a solo act, juggling your obligations day after day with no hope of changing or improving things; you’re part of a complex series of relationships that are driven by continual give-and-take, much like a teeter-totter. I think that we all need to remind ourselves of the fact that we can actually use this feature of our relationships to leverage more favorable conditions.

 

Do you remember being on that teeter-totter yourself, many (or not so many) years ago? You’d go up when the person on the other end went down, and, if they decided to stay there and hold you hostage up in the air or, worse, let go and send you crashing down, the game would certainly lose its fun.

 

The interaction between, say, an employer and an employee isn’t that much different. If employers refuse to budge, effectively “holding hostage” employee interests, the sense of equilibrium is lost. If employees fill that “anchor” role, their message is more or less that they expect employers to work around them, making demands that sometimes veer towards the extreme. An interaction like this quickly becomes a tug-of-war between inflexible opposites, doomed to breed dissatisfaction on one side or another.

 

With a little compromise–and it’s easier than you think–both parties can be satisfied and the metaphorical teeter-totter can balance itself out. If, for example, employers agreed to measure performance by attitude and outcome, rather than by hours worked and amounts billed, they’d find themselves with a more self-motivated workforce. And if, conversely, employees committed to taking ownership of work responsibilities rather than feeling like a victim within the workplace, the overall result would be increased honesty and productivity, and decreased drama and buck-passing. Employers could provide more resources for safe dialogue, such as HR representatives or coaching services, and employees could in turn be more straightforward with themselves and their coworkers about their abilities and needs.

 

The gist of it all is that balanced relationships–whether professional or personal–are comprised of a back-and-forth rapport that can only be sustained by ongoing collaboration and communication. Transparency and approachability are the keys to achieving workable solutions, and, as on the playground teeter-totter, you’ve got to look the person across from you in the eye and let them know where you stand.

 



Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor: 
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

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The Ripple Effect: Current Events’ Impact on Office Climate

Kelly Walsh - Life CoachThe article can also be read on CEO Blog Nation.

http://rescue.ceoblognation.com/2013/09/18/ripple-effect-current-events-impact-office-climate/

 

Once again, global news is soaked in turmoil, provocation, and apprehension as the world awaits a forthcoming U.S. action regarding the conflict in Syria. The media coverage of rhetorical back and forth has become nothing short of omnipresent, a dull roar in the background of our everyday lives as Democrats argue with Republicans, political pundits throw around their credentialed weight, and Putin’s dour face peers from the homepages of news across the globe At a time like this, when there’s more speculation than actual news, the effect of continuous media coverage becomes sharply visible, particularly in professional environments where the psychological collateral damage means employers are left holding the bag from workers engaging in news but disengaging in work.

 

All day long, surrounded by manifold forms of technology–and technology-using coworkers–we’re exposed to these big issues of international concern, with all the controversy and commentary that accompany them. World headlines have become an increasingly pervasive part of office life. With Google Alerts, social media feeds, and mobile headlines constantly cropping up throughout the day, the presence of global affairs is continuous, giving us all ample time to internalize the sense of panic and confusion that can often surround events such as the Syrian conflict. Big world unrest certainly does carry over into in-office drama, as surprising parallels emerge between what’s happening on the world stage and what’s going on around the water cooler.

 

“Hey, did you hear about…?” says your coworker. It doesn’t matter whether he’s going to finish that sentence with “Shelley’s promotion” or “John Kerry’s statement to the press”; the mechanism is the same. Either way, such an interaction is a form of engagement in the office’s internal news mill, a network of information that might be perfectly valid but is just as likely to be good old-fashioned gossip. The less direct, from-the-source information there is, the more room exists for hearsay and rampant conjecture. The issue is just as vital in a corporate context as it is in a global one: news needs to come from the right sources, delivered promptly and responsibly. Have people within your organization ready to disabuse rumors in a non-confrontational manner. Rumors are only natural, and make for a good measure of workplace morale, but do make sure that you, as a leader, are able to keep abreast of them and debunk them when needed.

 

As early as June, French and British teams were attesting to the use of chemical weapons in Syria, while the U.S. remained silent on the matter. With such mixed information, many Americans could not have predicted that matters would escalate to the point of possible military intervention in the present day. The issue at hand is common in a variety of professional settings: here, as in many other situations, a lack of straightforward, accessible, and indisputable information led to wide-scale confusion and speculation. The lack of such informational clarity can inspire mistrust, too, so it’s key to make sure that all internal materials, such as policies, roles and responsibilities, career ladder information, salary and even severance plans, are readily available.

 

An oft-repeated refrain from the American public in recent weeks has been, “What does Syria mean for us? How do we stand to gain or lose from this?” It’s a question that, even now, remains largely unanswered, fueling the flames of media speculation and widespread discontent. Especially in fraught situations like the current political one, it’s essential to maintain consistent leadership communication. Leaders should have a unified message to stand behind and a means of making that message resonate with a given audience. Your role as a leader is not only to spell out what your organization is doing and where it’s going in real-time, but to articulate just how these developments will affect everyone involved.

 

The connection between allowing for diversity and intellectual freedom in the workplace and the current civil war in Syria should be obvious. In order to prevent ideological or personal disagreements from becoming antagonistic, foster a culture of openness. Allow for free-flowing communication and promote forums for spirited discussion. Encourage and reward genuine feedback from employees, and explain your own views and choices, so as to foster a sense of transparency and approachability amongst your team.

 

In that same vein, provide for private forums as well as public ones. Employees should have a safe space to voice their concerns and opinions, so make it well known that the expert, confidential services of HR staff members, ethics officers, and/or ombudsmen are available to all.

 

In uncertain times, it is only natural to value even more highly the aspects of your life that are givens, like family, friends, and routines. By clarifying the channels of communication, enacting decisive leadership, and fostering candid discussion, you can establish a similar sense of constancy in your workplace. Dissent is natural, conflict is inevitable, but the way you handle these issues–with respect and directness–will determine the success of your leadership and the reputation that succeeds you.



Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor: 
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

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Creativity Inside the Box – 1SmartLife TV

 

Sometimes thinking “outside the box” isn’t always an option. Sometimes the box contains laws, rules, and regulations that keep us safe or the people we work for aren’t flexible about them. But it doesn’t mean we can’t apply some creativity to these situations. In this video, Kelly shares some ideas and examples of how to think creatively inside the box.

 

Call 1 Smart Life Personal Coaching and reach your best life. (877) 741-0427

 



Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor: 
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

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Reinvention as a Choice – 1SmartLife TV

 

What labels have you chosen or have been placed on you that you accept?
How are they serving you?

 

You have a choice to keep the labels you like and to change or leave behind the rest.

 

Call 1 Smart Life Personal Coaching and reach your best life. (877) 741-0427

 



Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC Owner, 1 Smart LifeAuthor: 
Kelly Walsh, M.Ed, ACC | Owner, 1 Smart Life

Over the past 18 years, Kelly has successfully coached business leaders and people from all walks of life to reach their highest potential. With a Master’s in counseling, professional coach and mediation certifications, and 20 years of Human Resources experience, she has successfully helped others define their dreams and create pathways to success. She is the creator and owner of 1 Smart Life, LLC a new style of personal coaching with a team of experts in all of life’s challenging areas.

1 Smart Life on Twitter

1 Smart Life on Facebook 1 Smart Life on Linkedin Email 1SmartLife

Comment on this Reinvention as a Choice – 1SmartLife TV

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